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2019-10-16

What do the lines on a globe mean?

What do the lines on a globe mean?

Maps and globes usually have lines on them to help locate places on Earth. These lines are called latitude and longitude lines. The imaginary lines circling the globe in an east-west direction are called the lines of latitude (or parallels, as they are parallel to the equator).

How many lines does a globe have?

Answer: Generally we say there are 180 latitudes. 90 in northern hemisphere and 90 in southern hemisphere on a globe. Actually there are 179 lines of latitudes on a globe as the north pole & South poles are represented by points but not by latitudinal lines.

What about the lines running vertically in the Globe?

Longitude is the measurement east or west of the prime meridian. Longitude is measured by imaginary lines that run around the Earth vertically (up and down) and meet at the North and South Poles. These lines are known as meridians.

What are the special lines in the globe?

These lines are called parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude. Two of these imaginary reference lines, the equator and the prime meridian, are called primary reference lines because they are where we start the numbering system.

Why are poles 90 degrees near Equator?

Answer: But if latitude did the same thing, every point on the earth would be covered twice! So latitude only has to cover 180 degrees, from the north pole to the south pole. Taking the equator to be 0 degrees, the north pole is 180/2= 90 degrees N, the south pole is 180/2= 90 degrees S.

At what degree do you find the two poles and the equator?

Each parallel measures one degree north or south of the Equator, with 90 degrees north of the Equator and 90 degrees south of the Equator. The latitude of the North Pole is 90 degrees N, and the latitude of the South Pole is 90 degrees S.

What is 90 degree north of the equator?

Besides the equator (0°), the North Pole (90°N) and the South Pole (90° S), there are four important parallels of latitudes– (i) Tropic of Cancer (23½° N) in the Northern Hemisphere.

Who keeps the time for the world?

UTC(NIST) is the coordinated universal time scale maintained at NIST. The UTC(NIST) time scale comprises an ensemble of cesium beam and hydrogen maser atomic clocks, which are regularly calibrated by the NIST primary frequency standard. The number of clocks in the time scale varies, but is typically around ten.